RESOLUTION ON

THE CONTINUATION OF CLEAR, GROSS AND UNCORRECTED VIOLATIONS OF OSCE COMMITMENTS AND INTERNATIONAL NORMS BY THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    1. Stressing that the Russian Federation has committed itself to upholding the principles enshrined in the 1975 Helsinki Final Act, which include sovereign equality; respect for the rights inherent in sovereignty; refraining from the threat or use of force; inviolability of frontiers; territorial integrity of States; peaceful settlement of disputes; non-intervention in internal affairs; respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms; equal rights and self-determination of peoples; co operation among States; and fulfilment in good faith of obligations under international law,

    2. Recalling Article 2(4) of the Charter of the United Nations, the 1994 Memorandum on Security Assurances in Connection with Ukraine’s Accession to the Treaty on the Non Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Budapest Memorandum), the Treaty on Friendship, Cooperation and Partnership between Ukraine and the Russian Federation of 31 May 1997, and the Alma-Ata Declaration of 21 December 1991,

    3. Expressing support for UN Security Council resolution 2202 (2015), in which the Security Council reaffirmed its full respect for the sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of Ukraine and endorsed the Package of Measures for the Implementation of the Minsk Agreements of 12 February 2015,

    4. Reaffirming the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly’s Resolution on Clear, Gross and Uncorrected Violations of Helsinki Principles by the Russian Federation, adopted at its 23rd Annual Session in 2014,

    5. Stressing that under international law, no territorial acquisition resulting from the threat or use of force shall be recognized as legal,

    6. Noting with concern the continuing presence of Russian Federation-backed armed groups, military trainers and mercenaries in the territory of Ukraine,

    7. Underscoring the need for the Russian Federation itself to meet in full its commitments in the 2014 Minsk Agreements and the 2015 Package of Measures for the Implementation of the Minsk Agreements, as well as to use its considerable influence over the pro-Russian illegal armed groups in certain areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine to do the same,

    8. Endorsing the diplomatic efforts of the Normandy format, as well as the work of the Trilateral Contact Group and its four working groups, and convinced that the crisis in and around Ukraine can only be solved by diplomatic and political means,

    9. Commending the work of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission and other OSCE institutions and structures,

    10. Deeply alarmed that under conditions of occupation, the situation in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol, Ukraine, continues to deteriorate, leading to serious violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms,

    11. Deeply concerned by the dire humanitarian and economic situation in conflict affected areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions,

    12. Expressing deep sympathy for the millions of people affected by the crisis in and around Ukraine, including internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees,

    13. Taking note of the request of Ukraine to the United Nations and the European Union for the deployment of a peacekeeping mission (operation) to certain areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine,

    14. Stressing the responsibility of Ukraine to continue to ensure respect and protection for the human rights of all people in Ukraine, and to promote tolerance, dialogue and mutual understanding amongst its diverse linguistic, ethnic and religious communities,

    15. Also stressing the importance of meaningful and effective economic, constitutional and governance reforms in Ukraine, as well as the Government of Ukraine’s continuing efforts to fight corruption,

    16. Understanding that the impact of the Russian Federation’s aggression has made it significantly more difficult for Ukraine to realize the beneficial effects of recently undertaken reforms and anti-corruption measures on economic recovery and growth,

    17. Expressing concern that economic circumstances in Ukraine are becoming sufficiently severe that generous outside support in the form of humanitarian aid, direct economic assistance and debt restructuring will be increasingly needed for eventual recovery,

    18. Noting the ongoing violations of OSCE commitments within the Russian Federation, particularly in the human dimension, which allows and encourages egregious and destabilizing behaviour toward neighbouring and nearby States,

The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly:

    1. Condemns the Russian Federation’s unilateral and unjustified assault on Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and the continuation of clear, gross and uncorrected violations of the principles of the Helsinki Final Act which define this assault;

    2. Also condemns the Russian Federation’s failure to respect the Helsinki principles of sovereignty, integrity, inviolability of internationally-recognized frontiers and the prohibition of the use of force and threat of force against other OSCE participating States;

    3. Considers that the actions by the Russian Federation in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol, as well as in certain areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine, constitute acts of military aggression against Ukraine;

    4. Declares that the referendum held in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol on 16 March 2014 had no legal validity, reiterates its call on the Russian Federation to reverse its unlawful annexation of this region, and calls on participating States to refrain from any action or dealing that might be interpreted as recognizing the unlawful annexation of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol;

    5. Expresses its grave concern over increasing militarization in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol and statements by some Russian officials indicating an intention to deploy nuclear weapons in that region by the Russian Federation, actions which undermine global, European, and regional peace and security;

    6. Calls on the Russian Federation to halt its destabilization campaign in Ukraine, including the escalation of the conflict in certain areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, and otherwise to fully withdraw from Ukraine;

    7. Further calls on the Russian Federation to stop the supply and flow of heavy weaponry, ammunition, units of the Russian Armed Forces and mercenaries across the Russian border into eastern Ukraine, cease providing any military, financial or logistical aid to illegal armed groups in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine – including by means of so-called “humanitarian convoys,” and reverse the build-up of troops and military material along the Russian border with Ukraine;

    8. Calls for the full implementation of the 2014 Minsk Agreements and 2015 Package of Measures for the Implementation of the Minsk Agreements, including the comprehensive ceasefire, and calls on all parties to work towards a peaceful resolution and durable political settlement of the crisis in and around Ukraine;

    9. Underscores that the resumption of effective control over the Ukrainian-Russian border remains crucial for a sustainable de-escalation of the crisis, and calls for the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission to be given full and unhindered access throughout the entire territory of Ukraine, including in all territory controlled by pro-Russian illegal armed groups and in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol;

    10. Calls on the Russian Federation to immediately release and return to Ukraine detained pilot and member of the Verkhovna Rada, Nadiya Savchenko, filmmaker Oleg Sentsov, Oleksander Kolchenko and all other illegally detained Ukrainian citizens;

    11. Invites participating States to provide humanitarian assistance, as well as support for the Government of Ukraine’s reconstruction efforts, in conflict-affected areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine, in line with international standards and with respect for Ukraine’s sovereignty;

    12. Condemns the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 on 17 July 2014 in the Donetsk region and calls for those responsible to be held to account, in compliance with OSCE commitments and international standards;

    13. Condemns the deteriorating human rights situation in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol, including intimidation, harassment and discrimination directed against the Crimean Tatar and ethnic Ukrainian populations, violations of freedom of religion, and violations of media freedom that include censorship and the closure of independent media outlets such as the television broadcaster ATR;

    14. Calls on all participating States to respect OSCE human dimension commitments in and around Ukraine, and on all participating States, de facto authorities and other groups in and around Ukraine to adhere to their obligations under international humanitarian law, to respect and protect human rights, and to conduct prompt and effective investigations into all allegations of human rights violations;

    15. Urges the Russian Federation, as the Occupying Power in the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the city of Sevastopol, to permit and facilitate the work in that region of international organizations and human rights non-governmental organizations, the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities, the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights and the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media;

    16. Encourages participating States to help provide the OSCE with all the support necessary to fulfil its responsibilities in Ukraine;

    17. Congratulates the Ukrainian people on holding presidential and parliamentary elections in 2014 that were largely in line with international commitments;

    18. Commends the passage of several laws in Ukraine that, if implemented, will strengthen the economy and rule of law and assist in the fight against corruption;

    19. Encourages participating States to provide more humanitarian aid as well as a meaningful level of economic assistance and other forms of support in direct response to a continued Ukrainian government commitment and ongoing efforts to combat corruption, encourage investment, ensure energy security and maintain the health and other services provided to the citizens of Ukraine;

    20. Notes the beneficial effects of a strongly recovering Ukrainian economy on trade, cooperation and security across the OSCE region;

    21. Affirms the right of Georgia and the Republic of Moldova to be free of coercive external influence from the Russian Federation and reconfirms its support for their independence, sovereignty, and territorial integrity;

    22. Supports efforts to find lasting, peaceful solutions to the conflict in Ukraine, as well as the frozen conflicts in Georgia (South Ossetia and Abkhazia), the Republic of Moldova (Transnistria) and Azerbaijan (Nagorno-Karabakh and adjacent territories) that respect the principles of the Helsinki Final Act and international law, in order to ensure a stable, prosperous and democratic future for all of the people of these states;

    23. Calls on the Russian Federation to take practical steps to implement the 2014 OSCE PA Baku Declaration and the resolution entitled “Clear, Gross and Uncorrected Violations of Helsinki Principles by the Russian Federation”;

    24. Urges the Russian Federation to bring itself into compliance with its commitments regarding respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms as well as the building, consolidation and strengthening of democratic institutions;

    25. Reminds all other participating States of the ongoing need to consider and take appropriate action to safeguard human rights, democracy and the rule of law by peaceful means in extraordinary circumstances when clear, gross and uncorrected violations of relevant OSCE commitments are taking place.