RESOLUTION ON

RESPONSIBILITY TO COMBAT HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS FOR GOODS AND SERVICES

    1. Recalling the principles of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly’s St. Petersburg Declaration (1999), Brussels Declaration (2006) and Kyiv Declaration (2007), and the Belgrade Declaration of 2011, as well as efforts by participating States to implement the OSCE Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings, and Addendums to the Action Plan in 2005 and 2013, and all OSCE commitments related to combating trafficking,

    2. Recalling that the 2013 Addendum to the OSCE Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings calls on participating States to develop and implement policies and actions, including law enforcement co-operation between participating States, to prevent the tourism industry from being used for all forms of trafficking in human beings, in particular for sexual exploitation of children, and that the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly’s Baku Declaration of 2014 called on OSCE participating States to facilitate appropriate law enforcement co-ordination and notification procedures between participating States, as well as with other destination States, so that States are aware in advance of travel by individuals previously convicted of serious sex crimes against children,

    3. Welcoming the designation of 30 July as the World Day against Trafficking in Persons in line with UN General Assembly resolution 68/192 of 18 December 2013,

    4. Recognizing the importance of the United Nations Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons, adopted by UN General Assembly resolution 64/293 of 30 July 2010, and stressing the importance of its full implementation,

    5. Remembering the proceedings of the 11th High Level Alliance against Trafficking Conference on “Preventing Trafficking in Human Beings for Labour Exploitation: Decent Work and Social Justice,”

    6. Emphasizing that the 2013 Addendum to the Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings calls on OSCE institutions to update internal regulations so that no activities of the OSCE executive structures, including contracts for goods and services, contribute to any form of trafficking in human beings,

    7. Underscoring that the 2013 Addendum to the Action Plan to Combat Trafficking in Human Beings also calls on participating States to consider “including a zero tolerance policy...in government procurement of good and services” as well as to promote “clear criteria...for the official registration of recruitment and placement agencies, and monitoring the activities of such agencies in an effort to prevent all forms of [trafficking in human beings]” and for considering the removal of recruitment fees,

    8. Alarmed that, according to the International Labour Organization, human trafficking in the private economy generates US $150 billion in illegal profits per year, predominantly in the sectors of construction, manufacturing, entertainment, domestic work, and agriculture,

    9. Concerned that most legal businesses do not have in place policies, audits, and reporting procedures to ensure that the goods and services they sell to participating States are free of products made, mined, or harvested by human trafficking victims,

    10. Encouraged that some corporations are beginning to examine their supply chains and insist on best practices to ensure that their suppliers are not utilizing trafficking victims or participating in fraudulent recruiting practices,

    11. Welcoming the example that some governments now require contractors for goods and services to have in place a plan to ensure that subcontractors and employees do not participate in activities that contribute to or that constitute human trafficking, including regulations that penalize contractors, subcontractors and/or their employees who:
      1. destroy, conceal, remove, confiscate, or otherwise deny an employee access to that employee’s identity or immigration documents without the employee’s consent,
      2. fail to abide by any contractual provision to pay return transportation costs upon the end of employment for the purpose of pressuring an employee into continued employment,
      3. solicit a person for the purpose of employment, or offers employment, by means of materially false or fraudulent pretences, representations, or promises regarding that employment,
      4. charge recruited employees unreasonable placement or recruitment fees, or any such fee that violates the laws of the country from which an employee is recruited, or
      5. provide or arrange housing that fails to meet host country housing and safety standards,
    12. Concerned that most participating States do not have in place policies, audits, reporting procedures, and penalties to ensure that the billions of tax dollars spent each year on government contracts for goods and services are not increasing the illegal profits of human traffickers,

The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly:

    1. Urges the OSCE to review existing requirements and ensure that OSCE contracts for goods and services only go to businesses that have in place the appropriate policies, audits, reporting procedures, and recruitment safeguards to prevent human trafficking in their supply chains;

    2. Calls on the OSCE Special Representative and Co-ordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings, in consultation with the Co-ordinator for Economic and Environmental Activities, to consult with participating States to develop a handbook on best practices for companies to prevent human trafficking in their supply chains;

    3. Calls on participating States to require by law and regulation that all government contracts for goods and services go only to businesses that have a plan in place to ensure that their subcontractors and employees do not participate in activities that contribute to or that constitute human trafficking;

    4. Urges participating States to officially register recruitment and placement agencies and monitor the activities of such agencies in an effort to prevent all forms of trafficking in human beings;

    5. Invites participating States to encourage all businesses to adopt policies and procedures to prevent labour trafficking in their supply chains;

    6. Calls on the European Union, its Member States and other OSCE participating States to create and make public a common list of companies guilty of trafficking in human beings. Listed companies may no longer participate in public tender procedures initiated by the authorities involved in drawing up the list for two years and must change their practices before being permitted to tender for contracts;

    7. Calls on the European Union, its Member States and other OSCE participating States to conduct a study to see if low prices applied to goods and services under public contracts are connected with trafficking in human beings, including not respecting minimum wages;

    8. Calls on the European Union, its Member States and other OSCE participating States to invalidate the awarding of public contracts if the company has a history of violating the enumerated human rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.